Future news, official screens

video installation, 2019

The project uses past and present news rhetorics to make a speculation about how information will be presented in the future - and by whom.

It explores a future scenario where, after a certain event, electrical devices are damaged. This causes the production of new visual content to be momentarily not possible. The only means of visual expression are some rescued materials, which are used by the government to provide information about new developments of the crisis. The installation takes the form of a news station on the street, the news being a more exaggerated form of today's tendencies to base everything on opinions and emotions rather than facts.

Themes adressed are the relationship between private news media, governments and corporations, post truth and the current attitude towards official news, the decaying belief in photgraphic realism.

Developed part of the Open Archief project initiated by Het Nederlands Instituut voor Beeld en Geluid (The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision) and Het Nieuwe Instituut, supported by Mondriaan Fonds.

Exhibited at:
- Open Archief - Dutch Design Week, Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, October 2019
- Open Archief, Het Nieuwe Instituut, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, November-January 2019

Glitchmaster: Matija Pekić

Find the image references on the bottom of the page.

Photos above by Peter Cox, courtesy of Het Nieuwe Instituut

References screenshots:
- Cover image: Screenshot using a fragment from De lange hete zomer, 1975, Polygoon-Profilti collectie, Nederlands Instituut voor Beeld en Geluid, Creative Commons – Attribution-Share Alike
- Screenshot above 1: using a custom graphic by Oana Clitan, Creative Commons – Attribution-Share Alike
- Screenshot above 2: using a fragment from Baby- en kinderfoto's aan de lopende band, 1975, Polygoon-Profilti collectie, Nederlands Instituut voor Beeld en Geluid, Creative Commons – Attribution-Share Alike
- Screenshot above 3: using a fragment from Kijk op kikkers, 1973, Polygoon-Profilti collectie, Nederlands Instituut voor Beeld en Geluid, Creative Commons – Attribution-Share Alike